GUTTING OUR NEW HOUSE AND HANGING ON TO OUR BUDGET FOR DEAR LIFE
Doors

Knock, Knock Who's There? Our New Front Door

As you may recall from a previous post, we had picked out a few potential front doors. Based on the height of our door, our options ended up being narrowed. Our choice doesn’t have the same old charm the previous door did, but we like the warmth of it, literally and figuratively. Plus, it’s a nice snug fit.

before and after outside...
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before and after inside...
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When Mother Nature Speaks...

Today’s issue: Storm door, or no storm door?
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We always thought it was a given. We’d get a storm door for the front and back doors. We’d use the screens to let in some fresh air, and we can keep the inside door open while we sit out on the front porch, or we’re hanging out in the back yard.

We chose two storm doors we liked and went to our house to tell LC.

He pointed out with the quality of Entry Doors these days, we don’t actually need a storm door.

So the question went from Do we need one? to Do we want one?

We said Yes.

Then the question went from Do we want one? to Are we Sure?

And our answer went from Yes, to Why shouldn’t we be sure?

He pointed out we have Central Air. We most likely won’t be using screens as often.

We pointed out we won’t use Central Air all the time. And we like fresh air, and a breeze blowing through the house.

He lifted his hand and pointed to the back storm door which was bent from getting caught in the wind last year and was banging against the door jamb from the wind as we spoke.

“This isn’t the first house that’s happened to,” he pointed out. “And when it happens, the damage can go beyond the storm door.”

And suddenly we realized our argument wasn’t with LC. It was with Mother Nature.

Our new answer became: We want a storm door on the front of the house. We’ll hold off on the back.
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Sweating The Small Stuff

Choosing a door knob? That shouldn’t be a big deal. Oh wait. It’ll affect almost every room in our house. What if we don’t like it?

Do we want a knob or a lever? How the heck do I know?
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And then there are all those finishes to choose from:
finishes

Some designers think the doorknobs/levers should match the cabinet knobs/handles. And the cabinet knobs should match the faucets and the tp holder and towel bars in the bathroom, and oh yes, the light fixtures in each room need to match the door knobs.

It all sounds, in the words of Michael Kors, “TOO MATCHY-MATCHY!”

Hopefully we’ll have this figured out soon. With all the big decisions we’ve made to date, wouldn’t it be funny if this is what throws us off schedule?
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Going Door to Door

Well, the snow bought us a little time on our door decision deadline since LC is at his own home today, instead of ours. Here’s where we’re at:

Interior Doors
Due to the fact that we want to match all our interior doors, including the small doors we’ll be using for the closets, along with the fact that we don’t want to break the budget, we’re choosing between a four-panel and a six-panel interior door. We’re leaning toward the six-panel.

.4_panel_6_panel_doors

Front Door
We really wanted to keep the front door. It has so much character and history. But unfortunately, it doesn’t have any insulation. After much consideration, we’ve realized we need to be practical. So we’re opting to change out the lovely door with something that we’re hoping will be lovely in its own way.

Thanks to the build-a-door interactive activity on the site LC sent us to, we can consider many different designs. Of course, because of that we’re all over the place. We’re thinking of having a white door, but that could change a million times between now and when the door is up. Feel free to lob in a vote on any of these designs:

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Back Door
Not sure what we’ll do for the back door, but since it’s in the all-windowed room, LC has suggested we choose a windowed door and we agree.

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Today's Topics Of Conversation

An example of my notes-to-self prior to talking with LC today, and his answers in red:


Counter-depth vs. standard fridge and design implications. Either will work, but Standard is recommended. You get more for your money and the difference in this case is only a few inches.

Confirm fire-blocking is done. Done downstairs and upstairs.

Discuss upstairs floors - can we keep old floors? Should we keep old floors? We’ll discuss when the time is right.

Central Air - where upstairs will it be stored? The entire length of the eaves on one side of the house.

Countertops going up wall providing a short backsplash? Recommended? Either way is fine.

Washer/dryer - should we put counter over them? Not recommended since they are so deep. A cabinet above them, however, is recommended.

Basin for washing machine? Will look into it.

Plow for the snow we’re expecting? Will handle it, if needed.

Install landline? Just say where it goes.

And...


An example of LC’s agenda for talking to us, my responses in black:


Interior doors. We need to decide on a style soon. We’ll get back to you.

Door handles. Gotta choose those since they match the hinges, and need an answer soon.
We’ll get back to you.

Front and Back doors. It’s recommended they be replaced since they aren’t insulated at all. Gotta decide soon.
We’ll get back to you.

Return vent for Central Air. Where do we want it? It’s gonna start being installed Monday.
We’ll get back to you.

Obviously, LC is much better at answering questions than I am.

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When One Door Shuts, Another Gets Repurposed

There’s a chance we may be replacing the old interior doors, which truly saddens me. A relative wisely suggested we repurpose one or two. This was a job for the web, which turned up some neat ideas. Don’t know if I could pull any of these off, but I’d sure love to try.

Coat Hangers:
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Shelves:
IMG_3146
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Tables:
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494e1350c864d3c55926516a64483db3


Garden/Tool Shed:
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Door Knob Hangers:
Diy-Door-Plate-Wall-Hookrepurposed-vintage-door-knobs-3

Key Plate Bracelet:
keyholecuff3

Key Plate Chandelier:
IMG_2564
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Our Cutest Door of all Doors

Note to LC today - DON’T destroy the little door!

There’s a sweet doorway between the kitchen and the stairwell with the cutest little door. The plan is to keep the doorway. But if we can’t manage to keep the little doorway, the backup plan is to use the door for a closet. The backup to the backup plan will be to find a place to build a closet so we can use the door.
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Did Someone Say Pocket Door?

Big day today. Sig Other came out to the house. Yay!!!

Bro, sis-in-law and niece were there also, as was MVP Mom. Fun to see Bro go thru a house we used to play in and remember it in its glory. Not so much fun to hear him joke: “I feel sorry for whoever bought this house with all the work that’s ahead.”

Sig Other and I posed one of our challenges:

Downstairs Bathroom: It’s built off the back end of living room. The downstairs is a horseshoe with the living room on one side and the kitchen on the other. If nature calls while I’m cooking, that’ll be some race to the bathroom.

Bro’s Brilliant Idea: Pocket Door. It’ll allow us to put the bathroom door in the foyer. Let’s hope the budget can take it cause that’s the only room in the house we weren’t planning on gutting.

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